Snow melts, let’s move on from the Covid pandemic !

The latest big news 📰 on the pandemic when trusted expert, Harvard doc and occupational health specialist Dr. Stefanos Kales speaks we listen. He was the first to address the preventive power of face masks during the pandemic and now says let’s “move on”! check out his interview.
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Recently many parts of the globe 🌎 experienced extreme snow ❄️ ⛄️ even as far as the Middle East. Just like some endemic diseases, climate changes are here to stay. But as with all we learn and move on.

A couple of years ago our post on “snow literacy” proves current today. The earth 🌍 of extremes — floods, snow emergencies in winter months, more floods and extreme heat 🥵 causing fire 🔥 in summer months.

This year started with a big “snow ball” in greater Athens, and all parts of Greece which are unaccustomed to so much snow… although children live for “forced snow days” — the perfect ‘powder snow’ can turn into sticky mayhem that can make many adults very unhappy and life can suddenly become treacherous on the roads or in the home (power outages or worse fires 🔥). It’s the first time that the National road had hundreds stranded causing the government an unneeded headache and necessity to reimburse drivers.  Some narratives still show that our snow literacy  ❄️  ⛄️ is severely lacking.

There are many types of snow that one can find from places like the ‘National Snow and Ice Data Center’ (Types of Snow, NSIDC). We all can remember at least once making those wonderful snow angels so why ruin that pleasantry with a tragedy film of small-town America which received low reviews this past decade (Snow Angels from the New York Times Review).

Snow melts, hence ice, hence slippage and likely injury.  You need to sweep and shovel the snow, throw sand or salt on it as it melts, and at night when it is colder tread carefully (including appropriate shoes, and car tires) or not at all.  Avoid slipping, sliding, to prevent injury. Of course on the other hand, some physical therapists, orthopedics and sports doctors will have some extra work!

Question #1 — do most societies experience high violent crimes especially by teens and young adults due to CoVid lockdown?  as these years are the highest age of ‘sensation-seeking behaviors’ and the pent-up energy needs to be redirected into a more positive societal outlook? 

Question #2 — can parents afford to not go to work because their kids stay home? Why do kids with few symptoms COVID positive need to stay home 🏡 more  than 4-5 days? Focus on immunity building and as for the snow, some municipalities do not have enough snow plowing machines, and worse no salt to throw on the ice.

Question #3 — unrealistic expectations from some people — do you expect the government to actually plow your front door and sidewalk ? 😱 change policy and change thinking, buy a snow shovel and salt. Take some personal responsibility. This learned helplessness attitude needs to change.

Yes indeed, snow literacy should be one of the fundamentals of survival and overall health literacy AND yes 🙌 we need to move on from a “pandemic”, the data speaks !

One might think it was the Swiss Alps! Attica, Greece 2022
Photo by Rulo Davila on Pexels.com

Carbonara, Coal mining, Carbon dioxide, and Capitalism

The 4 Cs, not in this order, are key local and global issues. Well here is what we “left over” from our Italian “carbonara” a delicious mix of pasta, meat (usually ham/pork), Parmesan cheese, and egg, all grilled over a hot stove inspired by coal miner’s foodstuff. Nowadays this meal may contribute to our over-eating and high calorie cholesterol diet which is to be avoided but, for hard labor and athletes this is the food to help keep them going!

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Capitalism is never 100% bad as I say and many others prove that “responsibility” lies in balance ….much of the time progress for cities and towns that otherwise would be ages backwards ….indeed brought by capitalism but we don’t “see” it until centuries later. We need to reflect on improving quality and create more opportunities as well as maintain worker’s health.

This is an example of Lavrio (Laurium), a city in Southern Attica marked by a long history of mining (the ancient site for the first minting of silver coins used as money happened here). Factories contribute to depleted ozone with emissions and the so-called greenhouse effect by harmful gases like sulfur oxide or carbon dioxide.  Let’s keep up with our scientific and civic literacy — both components of health literacy— shall we? I particularly liked this scientific article.  Thus this place has an oxymoronic history, even though it was a place of progress, with many problems around mining worker’s rights …. many people died and sacrificed in the late 1800’s so that others don’t have to work straight 12-13 hour days (similar issues even in modern day with migrant workers!).

Lavrio overlooks Makronisos (the island in East of Attica, a place where those considered “opposing” the Greek state were sent to political prison in 1940s through 1970s). Many neoclassical buildings are now starting to be rebuilt as we say “respect cities” to be able to attract more tourism on land and sea.  As statues and memorials are built, universities in Greece now use the old mining areas for places of study it occurred to me that we can all be ‘transformers’ and as I thought this a beautiful rainbow appeared on the road back home …. after the rain, hope and promise are soon behind but we need to grab the opportunity when it arises!

 

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“Seasonal” and all that Falls…

Four seasons, all with their special blessings. Every Fall as school and academic year starts we always start with reminders of what the words “seasonal” can mean, depending on your interest or conditions…move to enhance our own and others’  health literacy!

    • seasonal reminders like “World Mental Health Day” (on October 10th) or focusing on eye exams through campaigns line “World Sight Day” (2nd Thursday monthly —  this year October 12th)  are good ways to brush up our skills and increase our health education  and social marketing approaches
    • seasonal allergies — most happen in spring and Fall so good for us to remind families or school of warning signs and think of allergy tests for awareness and prevention
    • seasonal eating — farmer’s market, choice of vegetables or fruit, thinking of compotes and other goodies to last us through the winter months ahead.

A day of reminders of seasonal fruit like quince (κιδώνι), pomegranates,  olives (the ones we eat, and the ones later made into olive oil…so many varieties!)

We visited a wonderful place that is open to the public offering an escape for families, all ages, sizes as there are plenty of physical and cultural activities to do and the best part? Getting in our 10,000 steps daily walking. The Stavros Niarchos Cultural Center in Attica, Greece is one of many similar places around the globe that are accessible and free to the community.  Today was particularly good as the smell of petroleum has subsided from last month’s disaster oil spill in the nearby Saronic Gulf. The bounty of vegetables and fruits that have been creatively and strategically planted was evident — more on Fall to winter seasonal  fruit later!