Re-shift and be Thankful

You’re drinking and having a good time, getting into a car driving fast, alone or with friends. No one volunteered to be the “designated driver” and somehow you escape hitting someone on the street, running into a tree or worse, getting into a head-on collision with another car or truck. You stop, breath heavily, are THANKFUL that you are still alive.

Rethink, and re-shift your mind’s gears … what can you do to avoid “crashing” in times of crisis? This is a post about re-evaluating your situation and even your life. This is not “toxic positivity” as I’ve read people describing those who may be in their own “positive la la land”…. perhaps this is “delusional” or simply a defense mechanism for survival?

There seem to never be enough positives, as there are too many grumpy, sarcastic, catastrophic “toxic critics” for my tastes.

Too many who lack faith, forever question truth as if blind, some live in perpetual darkness. Read between the lines.

“Toto we are not in Kansas anymore” as Dorothy once said in The Wizard of Oz — what a journey that was on the yellow brick road to “find home.”

People who have high expectations for others to “save them” yet don’t DO something to help themselves or ask for support, may lapse into negative catastrophic behaviors — ranging from drinking irresponsibly, taking inappropriate meds or street drugs, to eating crap food, listening and watching crap music, overdosing on social media “likes”, video games/TV. Many move to procrastination or sloth, filling their mind with toxic negative thoughts. This then leads to anxiety, depression, blame, in extreme cases suicide or homicide. Hurting themselves and others with little thought as to why or how they can change, not caring about consequences.

The fields of wellness and health literacy attempt to address how we can improve through language associations and subconscious work…. learn more about neurology and specifically neurolinguistic programming.

Daily mindfulness exercises can help us bring conscious attention to our daily activities/routines for better health long term.

  • Rethink and re-shift your language.
  • Focus on what is positive daily, and try not to dwell on the negatives (don’t ruminate).
  • Clear out the “junk” that surrounds you physically, and keeps you from moving on mentally. (Remember the Kondo method?)
  • Be kind. When the going gets tough, always ask for help!
What are you THANKFUL for this year?

The Audacity of Hope…Public Health week

The U.S. celebrates initiatives that make people’s lives better during April 1 – 7th national public health week and April 7th is World Health day (celebrated since 1948)!  There are so many issues to ponder over and one to focus on is giving people hope for better communities with less crime, more positivity, better infrastructure, building health literacy and overall wellness.

23578E1D-2549-4AEB-9B04-47EA81922508

Keep areas clean

Before Barack Obama became the 44th U.S. President I read his book “The Audacity of Hope” and years before a book about the community project titled “Streets of Hope” reflecting the community reorganization of a downtrodden area in Boston, the Dudley Street Neighborhood initiative. It is vital to understand how to motivate people and what community organizing is about — sustained efforts long-term. Reframing everything for positive changes does not mean turning a blind eye, but rethinking community strengths and addressing weaknesses. Understanding this first-hand I am constantly checking in to past efforts started and understand what Prochaska and Diclemente did so much research on years ago, the Stages of Change, a great one to add to our tool kits.

Taking the streets of most parts of Athens one sees many historic areas falling apart, trash, many run-down neoclassical buildings and mainly dirty tagging and more trash everywhere. As I travel to various places, I take photos of people’s work in trying to beautify their neighborhoods, often doing it with their own money and supervision. Change starts here, it starts with us, but we need to also maintain these efforts.

We know from the Broken Windows Theory (criminology article by Wilson & Kelling, 1982) that once one person creates a problematic situation like breaking a window other people soon follow. This can extend to modern ‘trashing’ of cities like the images featured above.  One friend’s motivational speech reminded me about social modeling (Bandura, social psychologist, would be  joyous with this) as her quote rings in my ears “if they can, we can too!” Let’s move away from negative to positive changes, see ‘what works’ in other societies and adapt for our own benefit towards long-term community health. Thus the concept of eudemonia goes beyond traditional wellness to incorporate physical, mental, and spiritual health extending beyond our  ‘selves’ to the larger community and global initiatives for all.

We have the right to:

1) clean cities without trash everywhere (Kondo’s method of cleaning house applied here) and most buildings desecrated by vandals. Respect cities.

2) hope for fellow humans to respect themselves and others by caring and helping each other and their environments.  Getting into positions of power to do away with corrupt politicians or any world self-centered mongul, let’s tell them to “take a hike.”

3) invest in health and focus on prevention — efforts like those by the CDC Foundation are prime examples of innovation and high-impact programs. Whether it’s an effort to combat depression or one to increase awareness of the need for vaccinations, efforts like the recent MIT Hacking event prove worthy of collaborative and volunteer work.

4) build infrastructure towards these goals, and be the change you want!

5) promote personal skills and efforts that have the potential to go global. This includes leadership and public speaking from clubs such as Boys and Girls clubs, Scouts, Lions or Toastmasters International (Toastmasters Greece link), and other similar local efforts reflective of these.

Yes we do, and have the right to the ‘audacity’ of hope!

F764E68D-6DD8-4EC9-9C26-DDD93C7EDC37.jpeg

Do clean up the trash people (a positive reminder, Athens)